First arrest under New national Security law by ‘Hong Kong Police’

First arrest under New national Security law by Hong Kong Police
First arrest under New national Security law by Hong Kong Police

First arrest under New national Security law by Hong Kong Police. “A man was arrested for holding a #HKIndependence flag in #CausewayBay, Hong Kong, violating the #NationalSecurityLaw,” police recorded on their verified Twitter account alongside a picture of the man and the flag.

China passes the Hong Kong security law that authorities fear will break political freedoms and floor the way for China to bond its control over the semi-autonomous empire.

First arrest under New national Security law:

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The man was intercepted by police and was arrested after police had issued multiple warnings to the crowd that they might be in violation of the national security law, which took effect Tuesday at 11 p.m. (1500 GMT). The law makes secessionist, rebellious, or terrorist activities criminal, as well as foreign interference in the city’s internal affairs.

It was imposed by China after months of anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous territory last year. “This is the first arrest made since the law has come into force.”

Law into power

The law came into effect in Hong Kong in the lead-up to July 1 the 23rd anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong from British rule to China and dramatically broadened the powers of both local and mainland authorities to investigate, prosecute and punish dissenters.

In vague language, the law criminalizes secession, subversion, terrorism, and cooperation with foreign powers. People who are convicted of such crimes can face sentences up to life in prison.

President Xi Jinping signed a presidential order putting the law into effect, and it has been added to the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s constitution.

U.S View on Law

U.S Secretary of State Mike Pompeo denounced the threat of a visa ban as a sign of “how Beijing refuses to take responsibility for its own choices” and said the law’s adoption “destroys the territory’s autonomy and one of China’s greatest achievements.

” Beijing’s “paranoia and fear of its own people’s aspirations have led it to eviscerate the very foundation of the territory’s success,” Pompeo said in a statement.

People who are condemned of such offences can face penalties up to life in jail. “This is the first arrest made since the law has come into force.”