The Queen’s Gambit The Manifestation Of Woman Prodigy

The Queen’s Gambit is the latest Netflix movie released on October 23. The funniest fact is that the reviewers failed to acknowledge the woman prodigy throughout history. When the Time rated the show with an astonishing 100 rate, the telegraph rated the show 40. 

Watch: The Netflix Originals ‘The Queen’s Gambit’

The popular reviews includes the following,

  1. The Queen’s Gambit feels very rare indeed. An adaptation of the novel by Walter Tevis (The Hustler, The Man Who Fell to Earth) that comes to Netflix on Oct. 23, the absorbing seven-part miniseries is first and foremost a character study. Its hero, orphaned chess prodigy Beth Harmon, may not be the typical mid-20th-century girl. But hers is essentially a coming-of-age story—one that asks what awaits a brilliant, precocious loner in adulthood. The show’s suspense comes less from the question of whether she’ll grow up to become the world champion than from the question of whether she’ll grow up to be reasonably stable and happy. – Time

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  1. The Queen’s Gambit stayed rattling around my brain despite (because of?) its many faults. The production and costume design are lush, the editing techniques are tantalizing and unique, the simple thrill of watching someone be incredibly good at a sport of skill remains pleasing. But it’s telling, and troubling, that the miniseries’ staying power remains its potential, rather than its execution. I keep replaying what a 90-minute feature take on the material might look like, much like Beth keeps replaying games she’s lost until she finally cracks it. Perhaps the show’s reliance on the same narrative beat over and over again, – Collider
This is what 'The Queen's Gambit' has done to its viewers
This is what ‘The Queen’s Gambit’ has done to its viewers

The Queen’s Gambit indeed a collection of sequences from the mid 19 and early 20 century. hough based on Walter Tevis’ novel and not real-life people, The Queen’s Gambit gives off that same regal vibe that we’ve seen on The Crown. The addiction-fighting-with-genius story, though, goes way back to Sherlock Holmes, all the way through period dramas like The Knick.