The Trial of the Chicago 7: based on real events?

The Trial of Chicago 7
The Trial of Chicago 7

The recently released new Netflix film  “The Trial of the Chicago 7” has left its viewers with umpteen number of questions. The uncanny resemblance of the events unfolded in the movie with the recent occurances of the Trump Era has left the audience baffled.

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Premiered from October 16th by Netflix,the movie narrates the story of seven defendants charged with conspiracy and accused of initiating riots in connection with anti- Vietnam war protests in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The riot grew into massive destruction as they were confronted by the police with tear gas and rifles. The seven perpetrators included Abbie Hoffman,Jerry Rubin,David Dellinger, Tom Hayden,Rennie Davis, John Froines and Lee Weiner.

Directed by Aaron Sorkin, the movie released a few weeks prior to the US elections takes into consideration the foul play of American justice system. Using the counter-cultural riots of 1968 as its template the movie encapsulated the dramatic events of present politics. Upholding the heterogeneity within the seven defendants he beautifully weaved the tale of fight against the injustice. 

The Trial of the Chicago 7

One of the most important aspect of the movie that caught the attention of the viewer’s eye is its strong similitude with the racial protests unfolded in the Summer of 2020. The place of Donald Trump was handled by Lyndon B. Johnson followed by Richard M. Nixon is the only difference that it makes. When the history repeats the lives of commoners are troubled and the injustice continues to prevail is what the movie attempts to exhibit.

The casting was skillfully made with Sacha Baron Cohen as Abbie Hoffman, Eddie Redmayne as Tom Hayden, Jeremy Strong as Jerry Rubin, John Carroll Lynch as David Dellinger, Alex Sharp as Rennie Davis and so many others. With its fulminating verbal confrontations, the movie indirectly serves as dramatic farce against the unscrupulous politics of the state.